Tag Archive for Kwik Sew 2777

Mr H likes his anniversary shirt

Pop Update: ICU …He says he hasn’t given up, so neither have I. One day at a time.

Honu Shirt

Mr H was surprised by the Honu shirt. I was afraid that he’d either seen the shirt in the sewing room, or had been reading my blog, but apparently not. The colors look good on him. You can see a closeup of the fabric in my post here.

The shirt fits him very well. It’s my usual Kwik Sew 2777, altered. Mr H is a lifelong weightlifter with the associated big neck and shoulders. Early on I draped the yoke on him to get it to fit smoothly there. Once I got it right, it’s easy to whip out the pattern and stitch one up.

I’ve gone back south, but the ICU waiting room has wireless…Yay! Hospitals are getting positively civilized. I’ll post as I can.

Honu shirt, ready for service

Pop Update: Monday is the day. The procedure is scheduled and we’re ready to go. I probably won’t be here much, if at all, next week.

Mr H's new shirt
This is (apparently) the first shirt I’ve made for Mr H since his birthday last year. No wonder he keeps suggesting that I make some!

I did *buy* a few for him at Christmastime. Interesting thing about those RTW shirts: not only were they anti-wrinkle, the neck button was attached to elastic making the neck a little bit expandable. The shirts I make fit the neck perfectly, but I know that RTW shirts seldom work out. It seems that when you get the neck large enough, the rest of the body is swimming in fabric–similar to the way that women’s RTW pants never fit both waist and hips.

Perhaps I’ll try to make him another shirt tomorrow. He’s got several shirtings in the stash, and I know he’d prefer a nice calm shirt for work. I’ll get them all out and let him choose one. I may not finish, but at least I’ll get started.

Not that I’ve presented this one to him yet. He’s been gone all week, so I’ve worked undisturbed. Now that he’s back, I’ll leave it hanging in the sewing room until either a. I can’t stand it anymore, or b. Our anniversary week after next.

Short sleeve shirts are simple to make, once you’ve got all the steps down pat. Here’s how I do it:

  1. Alter pattern (takes the longest, but once it’s done, it’s done until his body changes)
  2. Layout and cut fabric
  3. Sew and apply the pocket to the left front (I made a pressing template to make this easy.)
  4. Interface, fold, and topstitch the button/buttonhole bands
  5. Make pleat(s) in back
  6. Sandwich the back between the yoke pieces and stitch
  7. Attach the yoke to the shirt fronts, jellyroll style
  8. Topstitch yoke
  9. Sew collar/stand and apply to shirt
  10. Sew sleeves in flat with flat-felled or mock flat-felled seam
  11. Sew side/sleeve seams with flat-felled or mock flat-felled seam
  12. Hem sleeves and shirt bottom
  13. Mark and work buttonholes (I have a template that makes marking super fast)
  14. Sew on buttons

All told, it takes about 4 or 5 hours. This one was made in three evenings, and I’m always in bed before 10. I usually make mock flat-felled seams, which are a little faster than flat-felled and suit Mr H just fine. This time I sewed the buttons on by hand, putting in nice thread shanks. I don’t know if he’ll notice, but I like them on my shirts.

Try it, you might like it!

Happy Birthday, Mr H!

Blue/White seersucker from Fabric.com I surprised Mr H this morning with a new shirt for his birthday. It’s another Kwik Sew 2777, short sleeved for the rest of summer. (I had enough fabric for a long-sleeved version, but long-sleeves made of seersucker just seems wrong somehow.)

Mr H really likes the seersucker because it’s cool and doesn’t have to be ironed. (Since I’ve been ironing for him this summer, I like that part, too!)

He chose the Classic Seersucker in Navy and White from Fabric.com a few weeks ago, but had no idea I was already making it for him.

Sometimes I can be discreet.

These are so fast to make, that it seemed to take no time at all. I cut it out last Friday night. I made the collar (using my method from the shirt self-education), constructed the yoke and sewed the collar on Saturday afternoon. Another hour and 15 minutes on Sunday night saw it completed. Of course I waited until this morning to give it to him.

Kwik Sew 2777 Birthday Shirt

Shirt Self-Education: Cuffs

Are you ready for it? (Say ‘Yes!’)

YES!

After I took the collar apart on Mr H’s old shirt, I decided to check his cuff and sleeve placket to see if it was the same as the one that KF took apart in her treatise on the subject (pt1 pt2 pt3 pt4 pt5 pt6 pt7 pt8 and there is now a pt 9, which I don’t have a link for.) The cuff was exactly the same as Kathleen’s, so I proceeded to the placket.

To my surprise, the sample sleeve placket was completely unlike KF’s or the one on my Kwik Sew 2777 pattern, or the DPC placket I had been using up to now. I admit that the fact of the underlap being exactly the same width as the overlap should have given me a hint that it might be different.
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Kwik Sew 2777 #8

Kwik Sew 2777 in Navy Cotton, Front View Kwik Sew 2777 in Navy Cotton, Back View

Title: Kwik Sew 2777 #8 (?)
Fabric: Navy brushed cotton poplin from Fabric Mart

DH has been out of the country for a few days and came home saying that he had left two of his shirts behind. They were not two shirts that I liked. One was a beige, which did nothing for him, and the other was frayed at the edges. No great loss, IMO. He was delighted to discover that I had this one done, all but the buttons and buttonholes.

A long sleeved shirt takes about 3 evenings–when your DH is out of the country. When you only have the Golden Hour during Star Trek to sew, *and* you have to make dinner, it takes longer.

Wink!

Now that I’ve done my duty by making him a shirt, I get to make myself another pair of pants! Then, I’ll make his oxford shirt. I probably would have put it off a while, except for the two he left at the hotel.

I’m hoping that the guys who always have the booth of menswear fabrics will be at the Expo this year. Shirt fabrics–especially the dark and somber colors that Mr H prefers–are hard to find.